PRACTICAL ATLAS OF TUNGS ACUPUNCTURE PDF

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Henry McCann become increasingly popular during recent years due to its high efficacy and concise theore- Hans-Georg Ross Practical Atlas of Tung´s. McCann-Ross_Practical Atlas of Tung´s Acupuncture. 32 Pages and effective practice of acupuncture, this manual is not intended for use by the laity. Er3. McCann-Ross-Practical-Atlas-of-Tung´s-Acupuncture . Points in Tung's Acupuncture The most prominent feature of Tung's acupuncture is its extensive use of.


Practical Atlas Of Tungs Acupuncture Pdf

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If symptoms are unilateral. For the points described in this section. Needling the tendons will contribute to harmonizing and soothing the Liver. Symptoms such as dizziness.. Yang side is needled in males and the right i. Inguinal hernia and impaired vision are associated with the Liver channel. Channel Correspondence Da Jian Yin side in females.

Ju Jian Channel Divergences the Liver channel divergence reaches the Heart. The traditional prescription describes needling a point shallowly for symptoms located close by and increasing insertion depth when targeting more remote pathologies.

Channel Correspondence Huan Chao Needling the tendons contributes to harmonizing and soothing the Liver. For uterine pain after abortion combine Huan Chao Zone 1 commonly used to move stagnation in the Liver e. On the Channels. For infertility. Touching the bone with the needle tip enhances its effect on the kidney. For detailed needling instructions see the Appendix of this section Special recommendations Usually Huan Chao Lung Low back pain.

Zone 1 Zone 1 Points Heart Hemiplegia. Lung Knee pain. Gallbladder Liver Neck pain. Kidney Palpitations. Lung Enteritis. The Large Intestine Luo vessel reaches the ear thereby treating tinnitus. Fei Xin Comments on Indications of Xin Xi Mu Huo Er Jiao Ming The symbolism and correspondence associated with their locations have two aspects.

This is one example for Zhi Si Ma Zhi Wu Jin Furthermore it can be helpful during delactation because Zhi Si Ma Zhi Si Ma Channel Correspondence Zhi Si Ma This correspondence also covers skin diseases acne. While their effects on the upper throat and lower lung respiratory system are prominent.

Therefore they correspond to Lung skin. This explains why Mu Huo On the one hand. Needling Zhi Si Ma Needling the tendons contributes to harmonizing and soothing the Liver providing for smooth flow of Qi.

Together with its same named channel. The indication for chest pain and pleurisy can be understood through channel correspondences with Lung Yang Ming — Tai Yin. Miriam Lee reports that the Xin Xi points One cannot breathe. For treatment of whiplash Fei Xin The effects on the knees are primarily focused on pain radiating along the Stomach channel as the Pericardium interacts with Stomach via the branching and connecting channel correspondence Hand Jue Yin — Foot Yang Ming.

Miriam Lee recommends Er Jiao Ming Touching the bone also treats Fear associated with the kidney as in the indications for Dan If the dorsal aspect of the middle finger mirrors the Du Mai. Needling the tendons will contribute to harmonizing and soothing the Liver providing for smooth movement of Qi and extinguishing wind in cases of stroke.

Dan Zone 1 Furthermore. Touching the bone will invigorate the Kidney which assists in the treatment of back pain. Of course many similar symptoms e. Their Locations and Indications.

Which of the points listed under a certain complaint can be combined for a given case must then be determined from their modes of action Image Correspondence. Syndromes and Diseases 4. Therefore this section must be viewed as a point finder rather than a list of point combinations or Dao Ma groups directly suitable for treatment. Later in this book we will present a number of treatment recommendations consisting of established point combinations and Dao Ma Groups taken from various sources.

Therefore points listed for a given complaint will be equally diverse which reflects their specific relevance within the causal chain or the time course of a disease.

Channel Correspondence etc. Syndromes and Diseases aphonia Shou San Li L. The indication of foot pain is similar to other points in this area of the arm such as Jian Zhong Shao Shang LU — bleed for nosebleeds in children under 3. In Chinese medical terms this is a type of epidemic heat toxins. In that chapter Tung gives a list of conventional acupuncture points and then his specific indications for these points. In terms of Chinese medical pattern diagnosis wasting in this area of the hand also indicates generalized Qi and Blood vacuity.

Zhong Fu LU-2 — scarlet fever use bloodletting method Commentary: Scarlet fever is caused by streptococcus pyogenes infection leading to sore throat.

Xia Lian L. In the large Taiji projection this area relates to the lower back. Some of these indications are not surprising. For unilateral complaints needling is done contralaterally.

These indications are similar to the indications Tung gives for Chong Zi He Gu L. Tian Ding L. Yu Ji L. Regular Channel Points 5. To make the original text clear.

ISBN 13: 9783875692112

Qu Chi L. Wen Liu L. Large Intestine channel can treat Kidney channel through the opposite clock channel relationship. Even more so than a treatment formulary. Tong Shan Tian Huang Si Ma Shang Protocols listed in this section are possible treatments but not the only ones that will be clinically effective.

Jie Mei Yi Tong Bei Readers are encouraged to compare the points listed below with their descriptions presented earlier in this text to get a better idea when these protocols will be effective..

Tong Tian When appropriate the original author e. Tong Shen Jie Mei San Ming Huang When no source is listed the protocol is generally utilized by a number of authors.

Tong Wei Since these points are not discussed in this text. Qi Huang San Zhong In each case the clinician should take into consideration the image. Si Ma Zhong Di Huang Tong Guan Xia Jiu Li Jie Mei Er Zhong Jiu Li Yi Zhong In some protocols points on the trunk for bleeding are referenced. Si Ma Xia Shang Jiu Li Er Zhong From Kidney patterns: Wan Shun Yi Zu Wu Jin Shen Guan Da Zhui Du Da Bai Mu Wai San Guan Huo Ying Eyes Eye Disorders in General 1.

Bleed around lateral malleolus Hu 3. Influenza 1. Bleed upper back e. Shang Bai Bleed around lateral malleolus Hu Otitis Media 1. Gan Mao Yi From Liver patterns: Shang San Huang Dao Ma group Ears Tinnitus 1.

Wan Shun Er Bleed around San Chong Dao Ma group He Gu LI From Heart patterns: Di Zong San Cha San 4. Zu Si Ma Dao Ma group Bleed Zhi Wu San Cha San Otitis Externa 1. Disease Patterns of the Sensory Orifices 6.

Zu Qian Jin Gan Mao Er Ma Kuai Shui From Common Cold: Jian Zhong Xia Bai Chong Xian Blurry vision from glaucoma: Bleed Wu Ling DT. Xia San Huang Dao Ma group Huo San Men Jin Guang Ming Bleed ear apex Cataract 1. Zhong Bai Shui Xiang Chong Zi Ling Xian LI Lung Disease Patterns Pneumonia 1. Nose Nasal Obstruction 1. Bi Yi Needling Guidelines 7. Needle Depth Guidelines A.

That said. Beginning and Ending also says. Shallow needling is used to treat the superficial parts of the body and expels exterior disease evils. Depth of needling should be according to the season. This is identical to needling based on tissue correspondence. Beginning and Ending says. On Governing the Needles there is a discussion of the Five Needle Methods based on the five tissues of the body.

Needling on or near the vessels treats the vessels. Restrictions of Pricking has similar guidelines based on body tissues. Another guideline for distal point needling is that depth of needling is based on how far the treatment point is from the diseased area of the body. Needling on or near the tendons treats diseases of the tendons. There is a conspicuous lack of complex needle manipulation and there is no use of supplementation bu fa or drainage technique xie fa.

Needle Depth Based on Disease Location Needle depth is a vital question in the application of acupuncture. Most points are needled perpendicularly to the surface of the body unless the underlying anatomy requires oblique or subcutaneous needling. Needling the fleshy areas of the body treats the flesh.

For local conditions. Despite limited needles per treatment.. It also indicates that a disease of a Yang nature e. Deep needling is used for supplementing vacuities. Ling Shu Chapter 9 Zhong Shi.

Needle Technique Tung. Needling down near or to touch the bones treats the bones. Disorders of the Uterus 6. Disorders of the Fallopian Tubes and Ovaries 6. Breast Disorders 6. Disorders of Pregnancy and Fertility 6. Miscellaneous 6. Points by Chinese Medical Function 7. Point Indexes 8. Literature Therefore we thank all our readers and all participants in our seminars for their critical and helpful comments.

All of them are virtually co-authors of this edition. Reminiscent of all the great eras in the development of Chinese medicine, we are currently witnessing exciting debate amongst various approaches to clinical practice. In the following pages, Drs.

Like many students of acupuncture, I have been alternately fascinated by and frustrated with an approach that can overwhelm with the sheer abundance of points and indications. Consequently, over the years I have gotten to know a few favorite points from this tradition but have failed to expand into what is a demonstrably useful system.

To the new student of Tung style, I would suggest a metaphor. One might analogize the study of acupuncture to the study of a foreign language. In studies with my teacher Dr. To continue with the metaphor, the study of Tung style is much like the process of studying a new, but very closely related language. Because the ultimate subject being described by these various systems is the human body, and because all acupuncture ultimately draws from a Chinese tradition, there is much here that will sound very familiar.

For example, if a point is on the stomach channel then its unexpected application to non-traditional stomach channel functions in the Tung system actually sheds light on aspects of Yangming that are less often considered in mainstream education. This very tendency is addressed at length in the following pages.

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The point discussions which follow include ample comparison of various ideas regarding organ and channel function from both classical and modern sources. Consequently for the reader, the commentary sections can be as illuminating as the necessary lists of point locations and indications in the main body of the text.

In order to make the text more readable, the authors have put a great deal of thought into style of presentation. Like other Tung-style books, they have broken the points into sections of the body. However, I have found it most useful that they locate images of point locations, written location descriptions and brief lists of indications all within the same page.

As one becomes more familiar with the points, this aspect will allow the book to be used as a quick reference. For more details on how to understand the nature of each point, important groups of points are followed by the illuminating commentary. These three broad categories of theory are thus introduced early in the text and are referenced throughout the main body of point descriptions. As mentioned earlier, another problem for the new student of Tung acupuncture is the sheer abundance of new points.

To that end, chapter six provides an interesting index of frequently used point combinations. In this sec- tion, the authors have carefully combined the experience of senior practitioners in this tradition with their own clinical work to provide a unique resource.

A quick perusal of the protocols for common diseases reveals certain points and groups of points which come up most often.

I would posit that these are the most common terms in the new language. By combining a growing familiarity of the most common points with a better understanding of Tung-style theory, one might thus slowly integrate the approach with other styles of acupuncture.

McCann-Ross_Practical Atlas of Tung´s Acupuncture

Thoughts for the future from an interested student In my conversations with the authors of this text, I have been impressed with their dedication to innovation and a lack of that dogmatic tendency which can sometimes arise in a time where many schools of thought abound. Like most of us practicing in the 21st century, we are hybrids of the various approaches described by multiple teachers.

While agreeing that one should begin with a certain core prism through which to view the body, we seem to share that urge to always be on the lookout for new ways to improve clinical results. In that spirit, a few concepts might be put on the table for future discussion regarding the Tung tradition. As emphasized by the authors in the pages which follow, the points in the Tung tradition will be most effective when understood as part of a lexible theoretical system for balancing yin and yang.

To that end, future work might involve striving for a greater understanding of these points in the context of current channel theory. As mentioned above, when a Tung-style point on a given channel treats a certain pattern, then we might broaden our understanding of the nature of that channel. Another possible path of innovation would involve the integration of more careful palpation into the process of diagnosis.

However, like many Chinese medical practitioners, I have noticed that theory can sometimes be used to justify less than effective clinical strategies. Elegant theoretical explanations may justify point choices which do not address the true pattern presenting on the treatment table.

Once a channel is chosen for treatment, then both regular channel points and Tung-style points can be considered. Incidentally, the excellent index at the end of the book provides a useful resource for this very process as it lists the regular channel most-likely associated with a given Tung-style point.

Whether teaching students or in my own stu- dies, I try to keep in mind the fact that a well-founded education requires evolution. Jason D. We all owe a great debt of gratitude to Tung Ching Chang for sharing his family heritage with the outside world.

It was through his generosity and openness that many clinicians will be able to help more patients in the years to come. No endeavor happens by chance or by itself.

Thanks to my patients for their trust in my abilities, and for being my most important teachers. Thanks to my partner Candace Sarges, M. Ac for her assistance with this manuscript. Finally my thanks go to my family, especially my wife Jen and my son Henry, for their love.

May this book help eliminate suffering and the cause of suffering for all beings under the sky. Among critical minds it is an accepted triviality that we cannot directly access reality. Even in physics which is perhaps the most exact science we need models of the world to make reality digestible by our conscious perception. The steps within the causal chain remain unclear; yet it works.

I remember how it all began over a cup of coffee at the TAO Congress Graz Austria when I showed him an edited handout I had put together for my Master Tung seminar, and we decided to make a small booklet out of it.

When Henry agreed to join as an author, scaling and quality changed and the project exploded to yield the result which we now present before our readers. My thanks also go to Ms. Last but not least, I am grateful to my wife Linde who not only tolerated my obsession to write this book but also condensed our long text into a cover painting which says it all at a glance. Introduction Throughout the history of Chinese medicine there have been several currents of Chinese medical practice.

Some were well seated in the Confucian scholar tradition associated with the transmission of canonical writings such as the Huang Di Nei Jing.

Alongside and concurrent to these traditions, China also had family lineages that were more or less kept as trade secrets among small groups of people. Over the last two thousand years of Chinese history, these family lineages have come and sometimes gone entirely if there were no heir to receive the information. Furthermore, even when these secret family traditions were taught, sometimes the true depth of information was withheld.

This very traditional aspect of Chinese culture can certainly be a negative and dark one in the realm of medicine, especially since the greatest and most important texts of Chinese medicine e.

Until it reached the 20th century in accordance with tradition, this system of acupuncture was passed down only from father to eldest son. As a Nationalist soldier, Master Tung also left permanently for the island of Taiwan.

In the early s, Master Tung retired from military service and opened a private acupuncture clinic. At the time he became so well known that he was frequently called to treat high level ROC cabinet members, and at one point he was sent as a cul- tural ambassador to Cambodia to treat the Cambodian Prime Minister Lon Nol — after he suffered a stroke.

In Tung produced a set of notes about his points that were used by his students.

This original book eventually went out of print but many of his students and their students went on to write about the system. In the early s, Taiwan began the process of formal licensing for doctors of Chinese medicine. Since Tung had no formal schooling having only studied with his father in an apprenticeship setting, he was denied a license and forced out of practice.

Soon thereafter Tung was diagnosed with stomach cancer and passed away in The most commonly used points lie on the extremities and the head, and even though there are ample points on the ventral and dorsal trunk, they are mostly bled rather than needled. In other words, each zone of the body has points that affect the entire body. This chapter is translated in its entirety and included in this present book.

For example, Ling Gu Additionally, there were many points that Tung commonly used which were omitted from his original book, thus these points are not given a numerical designation and are only referred to by their Chinese name. In this book, 23 of these points are included and are listed in brackets within their corresponding zones as found in Table 1.

This topic will be explored in much greater depth in the chapters that follow. In the classical Chinese tradition, good students were expected to take a small idea and then be able to expand it beyond the original teaching. When I have presented one corner of a subject to any one, and he cannot from it learn the other three, I do not repeat my lesson. Examples include: For organs or organ systems, capitalization has been used when the Chinese Zang or Fu is meant exclusively; example: Zang Liver.

If the same organ is mentioned in the Western medical context it is not capitalized; examp- le: Romanization Chinese is a language that is quite different from European languages such as English, which are written with alphabets.

For people who cannot read Chinese characters, linguists have devel- oped ways of Romanizing Chinese, in other words writing out the pronunciation of Chinese words with the Ro- man alphabet. The two most common Romanization systems are Wade-Giles, the older of the two, and Hanyu Pinyin or Pinyin for short , the newer of the two. Furthermore, all authentic lineages of medicine, including the Tung family lineage of classical acupuncture, embody these very same principles.

At the beginning of this chapter Huang Di asks Qi Bo why contemporary people frequently suffer illnesses and live short lives while people in ancient times enjoyed health and vigor until the age of The answer that Qi Bo gives begins to describe the main guiding principle in all of Chinese medicine.

Later physicians agree. Thus, understanding change in natural world allows the physician to understand the human body in both health and disease. When physicians fathom this, they understand how to rectifying disharmonies which create disease.

Within this model the human organism is viewed as a microcosm with structural and functional characteristics corresponding to those of its immediate environment and nature, as well as to those of the universe.

On a smaller scale, analogous rules of correspondence can be observed within the human organism which apart from their philosophical implications, have been of wide practical use in acupuncture therapy.

They provide us with a reliable tool for point selection, location, and indication. The three systems eventually converge to yield the therapeutic point s.

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All acupuncture points are distal points. Consequently, each part of the body can inluence every other part through its anatomical and functional relationships with the whole organism. It is this model of mutual interrelationship between corresponding parts which provides the rationale for treating diseased structures by needling distant and analogous healthy areas. Without embarking on a detailed analysis we wish to briely mention three of them. Embryonic cells contain enough genetic information to develop into a whole organism, and even in adulthood cells can retain some of this potential.

Another example is the surface of the sensory-motor cortex of the brain which looks like a distorted map of the whole body and governs important input-output relations of the limbs and trunk. The term Large Taiji is used in two different contexts, namely A when treating diseased extremities or B when treating diseased areas of the trunk including the Three Jiao and Zang Fu located within these areas , and of the head.

Large Taiji A In the Large Taiji A diseased parts of extremities are projected onto corresponding areas of other extremities. Another approach to understanding this kind of Taiji is perhaps implicit in the Su Wen Chapter 63 on Miu Ci, the so-called misleading piercing: T-2 Large Taiji A: Correspondence of the extremities The simplest constellation is that a diseased extremity is projected onto its opposite counterpart.

Thus arm corresponds to arm, and leg corresponds to leg.

Heart, Large and Small Intestines Lung, Heart, Six Fu-bowels Heart, Six Fu-bowels margin of the phalangeal bone; on the Large Intestine channel Channel Correspondence Da Jian The Large Intestine channel by itself and via the Stomach chan- nel same name correspondence inluences the face including especially the teeth and eyes and the gastro- intestinal tract.

Inguinal hernia and impaired vision are associated with the Liver channel, which has a branching and connecting channel correspondence with the Large Intestine Yang Ming — Jue Yin. In cases of cardiac dysfunction and its consequences e. Symptoms such as dizziness, vertigo and blurred vision occurring together may be due to combined dysfunctions of the Liver and the cardio-vascular system; both are covered by the channel correspondences described.

Needling the tendons will contribute to harmonizing and soothing the Liver.

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Needling Zhong Jian Da Jian For detailed needling instructions see the Appendix of this section. The traditional prescription describes needling a point shallowly for symptoms located close by and increasing insertion depth when targeting more remote pathologies. For the points described in this section, needling 0.

Traditional guidelines also contraindicate bilateral needling of Da Jian Furthermore, the left i. If symptoms are unilateral, needling can be done contralaterally regardless of gender.

Comments on Indications of Huan Chao Needling the tendons contributes to harmonizing and soothing the Liver. Touching the bone with the needle tip enhances its effect on the Kidney. Special recommendations Usually Huan Chao For infertility, habitual miscarriage, and other dysfunction of the female reproductive system Huan Chao For uterine pain after abortion combine Huan Chao Heart phalangeal bone; on the Pericardium channel Heart, Liver Heart, Lung the Pericardium channel Channel Correspondence Zhi Si Ma Zhi Si Ma The Large Intestine Luo vessel reaches the ear thereby treating tinnitus.

ISBN 13: 9783875692112

The indication for chest pain and pleurisy can be understood through channel correspondences with Lung Large Intestine — Lung, internal — external pairing. This correspondence also covers skin diseases acne, dermatitis since the tissue of the Lung is the skin. Together with its same named channel, the Yang Ming Stomach, the Large Intestine channel treats gastro- intestinal tract disorders abdominal pain, enteritis.

Needling the tendons contributes to harmonizing and soothing the Liver providing for smooth low of Qi. Needling Zhi Si Ma Therefore they cor- respond to Lung skin , and Kidney bone. While their effects on the upper throat and lower lung respiratory system are prominent, any effects on Kidney or bones are obviously missing from the indications.

Furthermore it can be helpful during delactation because Zhi Si Ma This is one example for Zhi Si Ma However, Zhi Wu Jin Comments on Indications of Xin Xi The symbolism and correspondence associated with their locations have two aspects. The effects on the knees are primarily focused on pain radiating along the Stomach channel as the Pericardium interacts with Stomach via the branching and connecting channel correspondence Hand Jue Yin — Foot Yang Ming.

One of the indications for Mu Huo Needling the tendons will contribute to harmonizing and soothing the Liver providing for smooth movement of Qi and extinguishing wind in cases of stroke. Touching the bone will invigorate the Kidney which assists in the treatment of back pain. Touching the bone also treats Fear associated with the Kidney as in the indications for Dan Mu Huo Tung used Mu Huo Miriam Lee reports that the Xin Xi points For treatment of whiplash Fei Xin Miriam Lee recommends Er Jiao Ming Dan Of course many similar symptoms e.

Which of the points listed under a certain complaint can be combined for a given case must then be determined from their modes of action Image Correspondence, Channel Correspondence etc.

Later in this book we will present a number of treatment recommendations consisting of established point com- binations and Dao Ma Groups taken from various sources. Some of these indications are not surprising, but some are different from the typical indications associated with these points in regular acupuncture texts.

These points are not explained in detail in this text and readers are referred to McCann, for more information.

In Chinese medical terms this is a type of epidemic heat toxins. These indications are similar to the indications Tung gives for Chong Zi Shao Shang LU — bleed for nosebleeds in children under 3, gently pinch the point for 5 seconds; one cannot use needle on these patients Large Intestine Channel Fu Tu L.

Wen Liu L. Large Intestine channel can treat Kidney channel through the opposite clock channel relation- ship. In the large Taiji projection this area relates to the lower back, and through the limb to limb relationship the lower leg, which is an area commonly effected by sciatica. In terms of Chinese medical pattern diagnosis wasting in this area of the hand also indicates generalized Qi and Blood vacuity.

He Gu L. The indication of foot pain is similar to other points in this area of the arm such as Jian Zhong For unilateral complaints needling is done contralaterally, and for internal complaints needling can be done bilaterally. Shou San Li L. Jie Mei Yi Yi Zhong Ming Huang Tong Shen Tian Huang Zhong Jiu Li Tong Guan Si Ma Zhong Protocols listed in this section are possible treatments but not the only ones that will be clinically effective.

Readers are encouraged to compare the points listed below with their descriptions presented earlier in this text to get a better idea when these protocols will be effective. In each case the clinician should take into consideration the image, channel and tissue corre- spondences for the points listed. Furthermore, points should be examined or palpated for reactivity e. Even more so than a treatment formulary, this section should stimulate thought about how each of the diseases listed can be treated.

When appropriate the original author e. When no source is listed the protocol is generally utilized by a number of authors, or comes from the experience or research of the authors of this text.

In some protocols points on the trunk for bleeding are referenced. Since these points are not discussed in this text, the description of location is given in the footnotes. Gan Mao Yi Ling Gu San Cha San 4. Mu Di Zong Bleed upper back e. Bleed around San Zhong Dao Ma group Jie Mei Yi Depth of needling should be according to the season.

Ju Jian The book has already made the rounds in my office, even disappearing on occasion because of its popularity, and the discussions that it is generating are already being felt amongst our local community of practitioners.

Clinically speaking, some zones provide better therapeutic outcomes for chronic conditions, while others are more effective for acute illnesses. In this case the practitioner must penetrate or be close to the tendon, which augments the Liver's action via tissue correspondence. Di Zong At the beginning of this chapter Huang Di asks Qi Bo why contemporary people frequently suffer illnesses and live short lives while people in ancient times enjoyed health and vigor until the age of

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